Recent Changes

Thursday, November 10

  1. page International School of the Sacred Heart edited ... Students in our middle school and high school wrote stories, articles, editorials, and researc…
    ...
    Students in our middle school and high school wrote stories, articles, editorials, and research pieces after we experienced the 9.0 magnitude earthquake on March 11, 2011. We believe that writing and sharing writing helps people to deal with crisis situations. We hope you appreciate the stories that we have shared.
    My earthquake story
    by Lucinda R.
    Dear dairy,
    Today is the 11th of March 2011 and it was free dress, Ancient Greece, and I was dressed as Medousa. I was at school and my friend Sophie and I were at our classroom waiting for the rest of the class to get to arrive. We were waiting and waiting. My teacher Miss Fish was on the computer. Now there was some of our class here but we were still waiting for others. Then Miss Fish said, “There must be an earthquake because my computer is shacking.” As she said that my other friend Sooa was walking in and she hear the word EARTHQUAKE. She then started to scream down the hall saying “EARTHQUAKE! THERE IS A REAL EARTHQUAKE!” But then I shouted back at her saying “Sooa it is only going to be a small one.” Then as Miss Fish was looking on her iPhone to see how strong the earthquake was the school started to sway. Some kids were still walking to their next classroom. Sophie and I went under the desks. I was next to Amy but she wasn’t very comfortable. She had rushed under the desk sitting in an awkward position. She had her right leg over her left and her right hand on her right leg. Anyway all I could hear was the sound of screaming and rattling. Then it was all silent all you could hear then was all the rattling the school was making. After about 3minutes it stopped but it felt like 15 minutes. When the school stopped swaying the evacuation bells sounded and all of the school went to the carpark area. When I left the classroom I was holding Amy by the arm. When I was coming down the hall I saw my dad out in the crowd. I just remembered it was the time my sister finished school so that meant that my dad was here the whole time. I could see that my sister was crying. My class was in a straight line. I was at the back of the line. The person in front of me was crying and that made me start to cry. Then Miss Fish came and hugged us and that made us stop crying. Then there was an announcement about a high schooler missing and her friend shouted out answer to some questions the principle asked. The friend said that the missing girl had left early. After that there was another announcement that said “Can all parents take their children home and if your parents are not here just stay where you are.” So my dad took my sister and I back home. All the way home my dad seemed upset but I don’t know why. My sister and I were that the back of the car, each hugging our legs together. My dad was trying to call my mum but the phones were out. When we arrived at home the boys in the street were outside with their helmets on. My sister and I ran inside as fast as we could. I went on the computer and tried to call my call on Skype and it worked. I was so happy. Me and my mum talked and I asked her “What time are you coming home?” and she said, “I need to wait and see when it will be safe to leave the building”. My mother was on the 21st floor of an office building. She Skyped again later to say
    “Tell dad to pick me up at 6:00.” Six o’clock in the afternoon came and I told my dad and he set off. It was soon 8:00 and my dad was still not home so I called. Then 10:00 came and they were still not home and I still had not had dinner. Then 11:30 came and then the doorbell rang it was my mum and dad, they were finally home. “YEH!” I shouted. I give them both a great big hug. Then I had diner and went to bed.
    ...
    Well that is all for now.
    Bye
    Lucinda
    The earthquake
    By Erika D.
    “Erika do you feel that?” my mom said in worry, panic, and concern.
    It was in earthquake. I am going to be completely honest with you. I wasn’t scared….. At first. I studied earthquake in 4th grade, and one thing I learned while we were learning about earthquakes was that Japan is made to withstand earthquakes. Though no matter how many times I told my mom before this earthquake occurred she was freaking out.
    ...
    The drive home normally takes 20 minutes max. But this time it took an hour. It felt longer because I was starting to get scared and my mom didn’t have her phone with her so our dad was probably calling us and because we weren’t answering he was getting nervous. The drive home was even longer also because Andrew had to go pee so we had to pull over so Emma and Andrew ran inside a convenient store to “go” and because we used their bathroom, we bought mento’s. The drive home was long, way worse than previews at a movie theater long. Yup, it was that bad.
    When we got home I rushed to my mom’s computer –I rushed to my mom’s because Emma already took ours- going onto Gmail hoping somebody would be on there, somebody I could talk to, so I could check if people were okay, if anybody needed any help, somebody I could talk things through with.
    ...
    there was. Yuka Sagi,Yuka, known as
    I and Yuka chatted from about 4:00-11:00. Sure there were a few little gabs but we spent ALOT of time chatting with each other on Gmail. Checking if each other was okay, talking about the things we put by the door if we have to make a quick getaway, about our dad’s not being with us and my dad having to walk home, what we were seeing on the news, how are family was, letting each other know that if they need anything just let us know, and how other people were. Talking things out with Yuka made me feel better. It was nice getting to let my thoughts out to a trustworthy friend, especially when my sister is on Facebook and watching videos on youtube.
    During this time is when I got REALLY scared. Watching deadly clips on the news was terrifying. Well, if you would excuse me, we are going to fast forward to when I got home and what we found out about my dad’s situation.
    ...
    After we watched the news I went to bed. I went to bed much easier this time. Sure I slept in my casual clothes and with my phone in my phone case around my neck. But I could sleep this time, my family was together, and just like my mom said during the car ride home, “If we have to die, she wants us all to die together, as a family.”
    My family is the most important thing to me. Now that I have my family, doesn’t matter what happens.
    Amy M. (International School of the Sacred Heart Tokyo)
    Dear Diary,
    The day of the evil earthquake was my Auntie’s birthday! (^U^)-to-(T_T) There were tsunamis, fires, nuclear factory explosions, aftershocks and planned power cuts. Actually, our area has not had a single power cut for the whole time, which is good for us, but I still think the people who are in trouble should at least have electricity power instead of us, since that area is cold but our place is warm enough..
    ...
    An annoying thing about the earthquake is that there are never ending commercials from AC Japan that drive me NUTS.. #(>w<;)#AAAAARGH! I hate the one with the song about greeting people, and the one when a lady keeps talking about cancer.
    I remember this as 3.11, not 9.11.
    By Amy M.
    Crying, Praying and Memories Back Alive
    Ashita K. International School of the Sacred Heart
    March 11th, 2011, the most terrifying, blood – curdling and spine – chilling day of my life. It started like a bad day does. Like an ordinary day. I had my typical lessons which were Japanese, Social Studies, Math, Break, Drama, Drama, Lunch, Library, English and then Homeroom.
    Although, Homeroom was a bit divergent. When me and my friends were prattling and giggling, my friend Amrutha screamed “Guys, Earthquake!”
    ...
    Soon, they said that the building was safe and that we could stay in the AV Room. It was very crowded after everyone sat. The only people in 6th grade left were: Swarali, Joy, Karin, Linda, Anju, Kana, Megu, Reona, Ellen, Darya and me. We were all talking. I actually kind of felt it was the school sleepover we had last year but instead it wasn't planned. After that,
    The teacher said we could get some pizza if we are hungry. Well, I was starving, so I got some pizza. Swarali and I shared a plate because they were running short of them. I ate my pizza happily. Afterwards, we kept on talking. I was kind of sleepy so I lay down and went to sleep. I didn't get into deep sleep but I slept. Then, when I got up again, we went downstairs to the cafeteria to get some falafels, and treats. I got a falafel and bunch of chocolates and brownies. I felt like I was the happiest person in this whole world.
    ...
    so happy. Swarali
    Swarali
    said “See,
    ...
    to go." Oh
    Oh
    well, she
    ...
    were stopped. All
    All
    of the
    ...
    the stairs. When
    When
    I saw
    Jane.K's earthquake story
    I was about to go out from the pottery room.
    ...
    I was so tired, so we arrived 5 minutes later then our guessing.
    After 40minutes waiting at my father's company, there was my mom! "Mom!"
    ...
    Damin K. International School of Sacred Heart
    Earthquakes experiment.
    Today I had a terrible day in Japan.
    ...
    While I go down the stairs, I saw many things had fallen off.
    I felt scared.
    ...
    eyes were fiiledfilled with tears.
    I quickly wiped off the tears and cheer up the others.
    So I start telling jokes and acted normal.
    (view changes)
    4:34 am

Sunday, September 25

  1. 5:32 am

Wednesday, August 31

  1. page International School of the Sacred Heart edited ... Students in our middle school and high school wrote stories, articles, editorials, and researc…
    ...
    Students in our middle school and high school wrote stories, articles, editorials, and research pieces after we experienced the 9.0 magnitude earthquake on March 11, 2011. We believe that writing and sharing writing helps people to deal with crisis situations. We hope you appreciate the stories that we have shared.
    My earthquake story
    by Lucinda RizzoR.
    Dear dairy,
    Today is the 11th of March 2011 and it was free dress, Ancient Greece, and I was dressed as Medousa. I was at school and my friend Sophie and I were at our classroom waiting for the rest of the class to get to arrive. We were waiting and waiting. My teacher Miss Fish was on the computer. Now there was some of our class here but we were still waiting for others. Then Miss Fish said, “There must be an earthquake because my computer is shacking.” As she said that my other friend Sooa was walking in and she hear the word EARTHQUAKE. She then started to scream down the hall saying “EARTHQUAKE! THERE IS A REAL EARTHQUAKE!” But then I shouted back at her saying “Sooa it is only going to be a small one.” Then as Miss Fish was looking on her iPhone to see how strong the earthquake was the school started to sway. Some kids were still walking to their next classroom. Sophie and I went under the desks. I was next to Amy but she wasn’t very comfortable. She had rushed under the desk sitting in an awkward position. She had her right leg over her left and her right hand on her right leg. Anyway all I could hear was the sound of screaming and rattling. Then it was all silent all you could hear then was all the rattling the school was making. After about 3minutes it stopped but it felt like 15 minutes. When the school stopped swaying the evacuation bells sounded and all of the school went to the carpark area. When I left the classroom I was holding Amy by the arm. When I was coming down the hall I saw my dad out in the crowd. I just remembered it was the time my sister finished school so that meant that my dad was here the whole time. I could see that my sister was crying. My class was in a straight line. I was at the back of the line. The person in front of me was crying and that made me start to cry. Then Miss Fish came and hugged us and that made us stop crying. Then there was an announcement about a high schooler missing and her friend shouted out answer to some questions the principle asked. The friend said that the missing girl had left early. After that there was another announcement that said “Can all parents take their children home and if your parents are not here just stay where you are.” So my dad took my sister and I back home. All the way home my dad seemed upset but I don’t know why. My sister and I were that the back of the car, each hugging our legs together. My dad was trying to call my mum but the phones were out. When we arrived at home the boys in the street were outside with their helmets on. My sister and I ran inside as fast as we could. I went on the computer and tried to call my call on Skype and it worked. I was so happy. Me and my mum talked and I asked her “What time are you coming home?” and she said, “I need to wait and see when it will be safe to leave the building”. My mother was on the 21st floor of an office building. She Skyped again later to say
    ...
    Lucinda
    The earthquake
    By Erika DaltonD.
    “Erika do you feel that?” my mom said in worry, panic, and concern.
    It was in earthquake. I am going to be completely honest with you. I wasn’t scared….. At first. I studied earthquake in 4th grade, and one thing I learned while we were learning about earthquakes was that Japan is made to withstand earthquakes. Though no matter how many times I told my mom before this earthquake occurred she was freaking out.
    ...
    I was so tired, so we arrived 5 minutes later then our guessing.
    After 40minutes waiting at my father's company, there was my mom! "Mom!"
    ...
    by Damin KimK. International School
    Earthquakes experiment.
    Today I had a terrible day in Japan.
    ...
    So I start telling jokes and acted normal.
    But still I was very scared.
    ...
    by Mei MasuyamaM. (8) Click
    ...
    by Hikari SuzukiS. (8) Click
    ...
    by Mayako ShibagakiS. (8) Click
    ...
    by Maya MinierM. (8) Click
    The Overnight Experience
    Nikita NagrasN. (grade 10)
    Note: The following editorial will also be published in a pending edition of The International, our high school's student newspaper
    On March 11, nobody in ISSH imagined that there would be an earthquake, completely disrupting the long awaited weekend. Instead of preparing for Bingo Night, drinking a grand-size frappucino at Starbucks, or catching some desperately needed sleep, students had to stay at school for hours until their parents picked them up. Wrapped in emergency blankets and heads covered in yellow helmets, students huddled together in small groups, anxiously waiting to hear the teachers call them and say, “Your parents are here. You can go home.” Some people stayed overnight at school, due to the cancellation of metro lines and the impossible traffic on the roads of Tokyo.
    ...
    But after reaching home and hugging their families, the students switched on the televisions. “The things shown on TV, like the tsunamis and burning buildings, made me recognize how bad the situation was,” says Erika (9). All over Facebook, there were statuses such as, “Couldn’t sleep a wink,” or “That was the scariest experience of my life,” but in reality, our experience was not the biggest story. Never in my life had I felt so lucky to have been at school, my life perfectly safe between the PE mat and an unfamiliar blanket.
    03/11/2011
    By: Sanskriti MehtaM. (11)
    Note: This opinion piece will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    This 9.0 magnitude catastrophic earthquake shook the Japanese citizens along with ISSH students. Making a lively country ghostly. At 2:45pm, ISSH high school students had finished attending the 2011 Talent Show, and were dismissed for the day. Minutes after the bell rang, ISSH juniors were in their best moods. After all, it was a week to spring break! Our exuberant behaviour soon turned woeful. Within the next minute our school building shook violently, the deadly earthquake killed, injured, and orphaned thousands in Sendai, Miyagi, Iwate and Fukushima prefectures, which are located in the east coast of Japan.
    ...
    We cursed, we prayed, and we told ourselves and each other that we were strong and could get through this. And we did. We were there for one another. We hugged those who needed comfort, wiped tears of those who were weeping, offered food to those to whom we had rarely spoken to, helped those who were anxious and worried, and showed our care and love to everyone near us. For this, I am proud to say I am part of ISSH. The affection we showed one another on March 11 is something that none of us will ever forget.
    High Impact
    by Momo MiyazakiM. (grade 11)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    When the clock struck 2:46 PM, our world shifted— literally. The planet Earth’s usually uninterrupted rotation around the sun was disturbed: the earthquake, shifting the planet’s axis by 25 cm, increased the speed of the rotation resulting in shorter years (a loss of 1.8 microseconds a day) due to the redistribution of the Earth’s mass.
    ...
    The quake illuminated both the best and the worst in people around the globe. An estimated amount of 40 million US dollars of were donated by celebrities and major entertainment/fashion companies alone from the US and EU. In Japan, thousands rushed to their local governments, asking to be sent over to areas around the epicenter for any volunteer work. On the contrary, a surge in crime was seen when a number of frauds, all claiming to be collecting donations for earthquake relief, were exposed and followed by a few arrests.
    In our ISSH community, when the earthquake hit, all were shaken both physically and emotionally. A few days after the earthquake, the community was seemingly dispersed and scattered across the globe. In the end, almost all members returned, creating a stronger sense of unity acquired through the crisis that we all endured.
    ...
    by Lisa KuoK. (10)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    Magnitude:
    ...
    speculators demanding yen, because they thought a lot of yen would be repatriated and the yen would strengthen in the future. It was a self-fulfilling prophecy.”
    What to do in case of an earthquake
    by Esmë OgiyamaO. (grade 10)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    Disaster always seems to strike when it is most inconvenient. The March 11th earthquake happened to hit right between classes, when everyone was scattered throughout the school trying to get to her next class. So in case an aftershock hits when you are not in a classroom, here are some things you can do to stay safe.
    ...
    Most important of all, listen to directions and try to stay calm. Even if you feel like panicking, it will keep the people around you calm, and will help you to keep a clear mind about getting to safety once the shaking stops.
    Radiation vs. The Rumors
    By Soumya BhavarajuB. (12)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    Following the massive earthquake that hit eastern Japan on March 11 this year was a chain of catastrophic events, the most sensationalized being the failure of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Though the nuclear reactors automatically shut down after the quake, a hydrogen explosion at the unit resulting from the failure of the cooling systems led to many complications including fires to threats of radiation leakages. Spreading faster than the radiation are the rumors started by panic-stricken residents with little knowledge of the situation and even less of nuclear physics, and perpetuated by exaggerated reports by the media. The stories have resulted in a wave of panic within Japan and outside it. Though the rumors have spread to Tokyo, much of the radiation has not, or at least not an amount significant enough to seriously impact its residents.
    ...
    As trying as this situation is for the Japanese government and TEPCO, it is not the worst nuclear catastrophe that Japan has ever faced. “A nuclear reactor could never become a bomb!” says Ms. Niedorf when asked if the situation at Fukushima could be compared to the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima. “A nuclear bomb has to have a very high percentage of concentrated uranium. The fuel rods of the nuclear reactor are not as pure, so it could never explode like a bomb.” As of now, the situation with the reactor remains serious, but according to the IAEA the radiation levels will not rise much more between now and when the reactors are brought under control. “All of the attention on the nuclear reactors is taking away from the people up north who need reassurance at the moment,” says Mr. Griffiths, HOD of the Science Department. “Most of us are worrying about something that shouldn’t really affect us.”
    Support for Japan
    By Joanna HwangH. (12)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    The devastating 9.0M earthquake that hit Japan resulted in a restless and worried two weeks off from school. Once we were back, many students were eager to start helping those who were affected most by the earthquake. The high school Student Council decided to donate all the money in their Emergency Fund for the earthquake victims, and the Social Service Council also announced to donate all money raised in charities such as the Thursday morning cafes throughout this year for the earthquake victims. The high school Student Council has also sold socks donated by Sanskriti Mehta (11) and held a successful pizza sale to raise money.
    ...
    The generous donations and help offered will surely contribute to the gradual recovery of affected areas so close to home.
    Shaky after the Quake?
    by Pounomi KarK. (12)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    The after-effects of the 11 March, 2011 earthquake are felt months later; most tangibly in the form of “aftershocks”. Most aftershocks are so minor that they are more annoying than terrifying, making us groan, “Is this gonna go on forever?” But a few aftershocks, like the 7.1M on 11 April, 2011 cannot be ignored and bring up the question: “Is another big earthquake coming?” Seismology cannot give us a definite answer to these questions, but it can compare seismic trends and give us a rough estimate of what to expect after a major earthquake.
    ...
    Foreshocks, on the other hand, are smaller earthquakes that precede a major earthquake. A 7.4M foreshock startled the residents of Japan on the morning of 9 March, 2011. This foreshock was preceded by a number of minor, escalating earthquakes which kept building in magnitude for the mega-quake of 11 March. Many big earthquakes are preceded by foreshocks, but according to The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, foreshocks have to increase in magnitude if a larger earthquake is going to occur. Japan however shows no indication of an impending mega-quake arising from the same fault line since aftershocks are decreasing in magnitude and do not follow the trend foreshocks do.
    Shaky Foundation
    by Sneha BhavarajuB. (12)
    Note: This article will appear in a pending edition of The International, the high school's student newspaper.
    The March 11 earthquake hit quickly and unexpectedly on what seemed to be an ordinary Friday afternoon, and the shifting tectonic plates shook the construction of the new gym, which was taking place at the time of the earthquake. An interview with Yoshioka Hidekatu and Nakao Kouzirou of Nakano Fudou Contruction. revealed what was taking place behind the white wall when the earthquake hit.
    ...
    "中国 福島原発事故の影響により、日本産食品、農作物に対して更なる輸入規制|中国物流情報." 中国物流情報 日本未上陸の中国内地情報が満載. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2011. <http://xn--fiqs8sunt3we.biz/wuliu_xinxi/details.b
    "YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.." YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2011. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v4=58vsU2mnk_>.
    {file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/bshull/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.jpg} http://photos.upi.com/view/263eb3a2577e8aa9a9a9e11156034fad/Fukushima-Dai-ichi-nuclear-power-plant-in-Japan.jpg[[image:fileC:/DOCUME%7E1/bshull/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.jpg width="509" height="338" caption="http://photos.upi.com/view/263eb3a2577e8aa9a9a9e11156034fad/Fukushima-Dai-ichi-nuclear-power-plant-in-Japan.jpg"]]
    (view changes)
    9:35 pm

Saturday, June 18

  1. page Grade 2 edited ... By Kalea: Last month a scary thing happened. We had a big earthquake! It was the biggest eart…
    ...
    By Kalea:
    Last month a scary thing happened. We had a big earthquake! It was the biggest earthquake we ever had. It was Grade 2 team time. I was with Miss Dear. My friends were there too: Pascale and Sujin and Phoebe, but there was other people there also. We were in Minato no Meiru Oka koen. We were doing rubbings in the park. We rubbed trees and money and cool things. I was with Pascale. She was walking, then she froze like a statue. I didn’t feel it but luckily Pascale knew. We ran to Ms. Dear. We went to the middle of the park. The water was going over the fountain, so it spilled. We were surprised. It was a long earthquake, but it stopped. I was happy that everyone was safe.
    After the Earthquake
    By Manami
    3/17/2011
    I have not been able to go outside from Friday to Thursday. I am bord because I can't play outside! And my grandmother is working in my house so I have to play with my little sister Mari!!! After the earthquake I didn't go outside bicause the nuclear power plant disaster's air is poison!! I would be really scared when there is a poison thing like that!

    {2Letters_4.jpeg}
    {2Letters_3.jpeg}
    (view changes)
    3:13 am

Thursday, June 16

  1. page International School of the Sacred Heart edited ... So I start telling jokes and acted normal. But still I was very scared. Earthquake Chronic…
    ...
    So I start telling jokes and acted normal.
    But still I was very scared.
    Earthquake Chronicle by Mei Masuyama (8) Click Here: {Earthquake Chronicle.docx}
    “What will happen to Japan when the nuclear power plant melts down?” by Hikari Suzuki (8) Click here: {What will happen to Japan Hikari.docx}
    "The Causes/Effects of the Nuclear Power Plant Accident" by Mayako Shibagaki (8) Click here: {The Causes and Effects of the Nuclear Power Plant Accident.docx}
    (view changes)
    5:01 am
  2. page International School of the Sacred Heart edited ... But still I was very scared. “What will happen to Japan when the nuclear power plant melts do…
    ...
    But still I was very scared.
    “What will happen to Japan when the nuclear power plant melts down?” by Hikari Suzuki (8) Click here: {What will happen to Japan Hikari.docx}
    "What"The Causes/Effects of the Nuclear Power Plant Accident" by Mayako Shibagaki (8) Click here: {The Causes and Effects of the Nuclear Power Plant Accident.docx}
    "What
    are the
    ...
    Click here: {What{What are the
    The Overnight Experience
    Nikita Nagras (grade 10)
    (view changes)
    4:55 am

Tuesday, May 31

  1. page American School in Japan edited ... {Screen_shot_2011-06-01_at_12.57.55_PM.png} The devastation ... look forward And cont…
    ...
    {Screen_shot_2011-06-01_at_12.57.55_PM.png}
    The devastation
    ...
    look forward
    And continue hope
    {Screen_shot_2011-06-01_at_12.59.01_PM.png}
    ...
    One tree stands alone
    A symbol that hope remains
    ...
    us all
    {Screen_shot_2011-06-01_at_1.01.13_PM.png}
    (There is a single pine tree left from the destruction of a forest because of the tsunami in Iwate prefecture.)
    (view changes)
    9:36 pm

More